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  • No Child Left Behind: 10 States Receive Waivers From Education Law's Sweeping Requirements

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...6pLid%3D134121

    Now please tell me that this does not lower the standard.

  • #2
    The problem with "No Child Left Behind" is the fact that it is pretty expensive to pay for. When it was passed, we were in an "austerity mode" under President Bush so we were cutting fed aid to education and hoping the States would make up the difference themselves. Then President Bush decides to become the education President but not when it came to helping the States with the additional costs of implementing these new rules. We should also point out that there have been different studies about the effectiveness of this program. Some have been quite negative concerning the value of President Bush's efforts in this area. Therefore, do I think that this waiver program is a step back for basic educational standards. Not really. There is so much disagreement and non conclusive results that it is probably a wash plus without it the States, already terribly strapped by continual federal cuts in funding, are going to be able to save a little money to put somewhere else in their already stretched to the breaking point budgets.

    I think the bottom line here is if the Federal Government wants to issue this edict about a whole new evaluation of student learning, then the Federal Government should be footing the bill instead of handing it over to States already strapped by other cuts in funding. To me, it made no sense at all and the educational value of the program has been shown to be marginal at best.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Lancer '65 View Post
      The problem with "No Child Left Behind" is the fact that it is pretty expensive to pay for. When it was passed, we were in an "austerity mode" under President Bush so we were cutting fed aid to education and hoping the States would make up the difference themselves. Then President Bush decides to become the education President but not when it came to helping the States with the additional costs of implementing these new rules. We should also point out that there have been different studies about the effectiveness of this program. Some have been quite negative concerning the value of President Bush's efforts in this area. Therefore, do I think that this waiver program is a step back for basic educational standards. Not really. There is so much disagreement and non conclusive results that it is probably a wash plus without it the States, already terribly strapped by continual federal cuts in funding, are going to be able to save a little money to put somewhere else in their already stretched to the breaking point budgets.

      I think the bottom line here is if the Federal Government wants to issue this edict about a whole new evaluation of student learning, then the Federal Government should be footing the bill instead of handing it over to States already strapped by other cuts in funding. To me, it made no sense at all and the educational value of the program has been shown to be marginal at best.
      Please educate me so I can understand you point and maybe agree with it. It could make me better at the end.

      1. Why does it create such big financial burden as you alluded to?

      2. Could you show me the studies of the effectiveness of the program?

      To me this is just a political move by the Prez. The reason I say this is because the article states that the 2014 deadline is unrealistic, and too many schools feel they are labeled as "failures." Under No Child Left Behind, schools that don't meet requirements for two years or longer face increasingly tough consequences, including busing children to higher-performing schools, offering tutoring and replacing staff. This tells me that the schools are ok with teaching, but can care less about the results. Granted I'm not saying that all are like that, but the article does indicate it.

      What also caught my attention is that nearly half of the schools are not doing so well. When I read that it is because the law requires states to raise the bar each year for how many children must pass the test...I get the notion that they want to relax requirements and not show that they are failures as educators.

      Last but not the least the article mentions that last fall a Senate committee passed a bipartisan bill to update the law, but it was opposed by the administration and did not go before the full Senate for a vote.
      Last edited by wisdome; 02-09-2012, 04:31 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        wisdome

        I'm not ignoring you, I've been compiling some things concerning the questions you asked me about "No Child Left Behind". I think you will find them interesting. One of the problems I'm having is that the materials I have found thus far do not allow publication or copy so I am seeing if I can find some examples that I can print and or give you the link and you can look at it for yourself. Interestingly, everything I've found thus far is from government studies that were conducted back in the early and mid 2000-2010 decade. I think you will see the huge additional costs this program caused to be brought to the States, not so much in the educational aspects but rather in the huge bureaucratic administrative mess that was created. Anyway, I'll try and get back to you tonight. I have to go to conditioning this afternoon and won't be back home until around 7 or so, but I haven't forgotten about you.

        Lancer '65

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        • #5
          While waiting for Lancer to do the hard work and research facts & answers for our education, I would like to being up a point off subject. Once more we have a executive action by our president. Again we hear of President Obama going around congress and just doing what he wants. This after a bipartisan bill was not brought up to vote by the Senate. Could this be just short of ......... ? Sorry for going off subject.

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          • #6
            wisdome...

            I am back at it regarding the NCLB Law and I will spend some time on it this Morning. I will be gone again this afternoon but I will piece this together as best I can without using any material that will be labeled biased by which ever side doesn't like it. It is a very hard job to obtain unbiased material. All I can say at this point is that as a veteran of many years in the classroom I can tell you what my personal experiences with this law have been but I am still searching out sources that are more "neutral" than a personal opinion.

            The primary issues have been a failure of the Federal Government to adequately fund this mandate, particularly the large administrative costs, unrealistic expectations of progress, the appropriateness of one test for all students, and whether basic educational avenues are closed because teachers fear for their jobs and now "teach to the test". Other questions center around who writes these tests and whether the questions are the best collection of concepts and subjects kids need to know. It is, to say the least, a very complicated issue and there are many different sides to it.

            What I have just mentioned here, barely scratches the surface...

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            • #7
              lancer, Its sad our public schools have unrealistic expectations--
              Sounds like OEA talk to me????

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