A New Era? Nope. OHSAA’s “Competitive Balance Proposal” fails

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OHSAA: Competitive Balance

Change has NOT arrived. The OHSAA’s Competitive Balance proposal has FAILED.


Change has NOT arrived. The OHSAA’s Competitive Balance Proposal has FAILED.

The announcement (released on the OHSAA’s Twitter Account)
signals the fourth time in OHSAA history that schools voted down changing the forumla for state tournament classification. Similar discussions/proposals were
defeated in 1978, 1993 and 2011. A study in 2006-07 showed no change was
needed.

The CBP lost by 38 votes.

OFFICIAL RESULTS

Bylaw 2, Classification (Competitive Balance) — This would have added a bylaw whereby each school would be placed into tournament divisions based on its sport-by-sport athletic count. The formula for determining athletic counts and to which sports the counts shall be applied would have been recommended by the standing Competitive Balance Committee and approved by the Board of Directors on a biennial basis. The formula for calculating athletic counts and the sports to which they are applied would have been listed in the General Sports Regulations — Tournaments. Effective August 1, 2013.
339 opposed; 301 in favor

MEMBERSHIP APPROVES 13 OF 14 REFERENDUM ITEMS (OHSAA Release)

Proposed Competitive Balance Issue Using ‘Athletic Counts’ for Team Sports Fails Again By Slim Margin

Thirteen of the 14 proposed Ohio High School Athletic Association Constitution and Bylaw revisions passed as voted upon by OHSAA member schools, Commissioner Daniel B. Ross, Ph.D., has announced. Changes were approved to three Constitution items and 10 Bylaw items.

The bylaw issue that did not pass for the second consecutive year was a proposal to change how schools are assigned to tournament divisions in the team sports of football, soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball and softball to address competitive balance. Rather than place schools into OHSAA tournament divisions based strictly on male or female enrollment, a proposal to develop a sport-by-sport athletic count would have used enrollment as the initial factor and then potentially added enrollment based on a boundary factor (how a school secures students) and a tradition factor (sport-by-sport success in reaching the regional and/or state tournament over an eight-year period), and then potentially lost enrollment based on a socioeconomic factor (the number of students involved in the free lunch program). The athletic count proposal to address competitive balance in OHSAA tournaments failed 339 to 301 (53 percent to 47 percent). A similar proposal failed 332 to 303 (52 percent to 48 percent) in May 2011.

“As was the case last year, we anticipated the vote would be close,” Ross said. “We tried the Competitive Balance Committee’s proposal two years in a row but the schools have spoken. I don’t anticipate getting the committee back together and bringing another proposal back to the membership, but at the same time I don’t anticipate competitive balance going away since this issue has engendered a lot of conversation among a lot of people. It’s an issue that a lot of state associations across the country are also dealing with and working on.

“I want to give special thanks to the Competitive Balance Committee, which was made up of school people, and those on our staff who worked on the proposal,” Ross said. “A lot of time and effort was put in to try to help make the proposal fair for all schools with the ultimate goal of ensuring that it was a proposal that made our tournament system better for the student-athletes in Ohio.”

All 14 proposals in 2012 were placed up for referendum vote by the OHSAA Board of Directors. High school principals had between May 1 and 15 to cast their votes, and a simple majority is all that is required for a proposed amendment to be adopted. The referendum issues that passed become effective August 1 unless noted.

The complete final voting results are available on the OHSAA web site (www.ohsaa.org), and the 2012-13 Constitution and Bylaws will be posted on the site sometime in late June or early July.

 

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