Sharks. Spiders. Snakes. And Spring Football. Things people are afraid of.

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Right now 26 states have Spring Football. Ohio isn’t one of them.

Thursday, the OHSAA Board of Directors unanimously denied a proposal by the Ohio High School Football
Coaches Association
that would have implemented Spring Football in Ohio.
The coaches were asking for 10 additional hours over a two-week span in
late May. Apparently they were asking for too much. I disagree.


Sharks. Spiders. Snakes. And Spring Football.

Things people are afraid of.

Thursday at its most recent Board of Directors meeting, members of the OHSAA unanimously denied a proposal by the Ohio High School Football Coaches Association that would have implemented Spring Football in Ohio. The coaches were asking for 10 additional hours over a two-week span in late May. Apparently they were asking for too much.

I disagree.

Ten hours over a two-week span when nearly every spring athlete in the state is done with their spring sport (only regional and state tournaments remain) isn’t asking for too much.

And football asking for 10 extra hours shouldn’t be the big deal people are making it out to be. We’re talking 10 hours…less than half a day.

The OHSAA denied Spring Football citing “concerns over the impact it would have on other spring sports, as well as the requests that would come from other sports.”

Lets attack this in two steps:

1. “…the impact it would have on other spring sports…”

So basically, I’m to believe that several athletes will no longer participate in track and baseball because they won’t want to miss those additional 10 hours of football the last two weeks of May? That the defections will be so great it will devastate baseball and track? I don’t buy that argument at all.

When I was in high school I participated in track for one reason – to lift and run for football. That’s a reality for a lot of track athletes. I was a fairly decent discus thrower but I never made it out of the district track meet. I would have loved the possibility to turn around and practice football those last two weeks of school before hitting the summer camp circuit. There’s absolutely no reason I wouldn’t have done track because of Spring Football. And I think the argument that a ton of kids would do so is severely overblown.

I think the argument that all sports need to be treated the same is severely overblown too.

2. “…the requests that would come from other sports.”

Huh? There’s already discrepancies.

Basketball and volleyball have AAU. Baseball has Legion. Softball and soccer have traveling teams. Football has nothing like that – for now. Ever heard of AAU football? No? You will.

AAU football is starting to gain momentum and with all the “issues” AAU basketball has created over the years, you’d think the OHSAA would be eager to accept a proposal that could hinder that entity grabbing any kind of hold on its most prized, popular and lucrative sport. Guess not.

With no spring football, AAU football has a chance to succeed.

There’s more.

Some will argue that football coaches already have an advantage over other sports because of offseason weightlifting. I’m pretty sure any sport can find time in the weight room, so that argument is weak.

So is this one…I’m also to believe that football coaches that coach spring sports – either head or assistant – won’t coach those sports because of those extra 10 hours? I doubt it. You seen the economy lately? People need money and dropping a stipend over 10 additional hours seems unlikely no matter how big of a diehard.

So what exactly have we been protected from by the denial of Spring Football? Certainly not the fight that will continue to rage over it.

This issue isn’t going away.

Expect Spring Football to remain in the forefront of the state’s high school psyche and expect some sort of “happy medium” to be reached eventually.

When? Who knows? But it’s going to take more than 10 hours to figure out.

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